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August 2016 A Review of Nonparametric Hypothesis Tests of Isotropy Properties in Spatial Data
Zachary D. Weller, Jennifer A. Hoeting
Statist. Sci. 31(3): 305-324 (August 2016). DOI: 10.1214/16-STS547

Abstract

An important aspect of modeling spatially referenced data is appropriately specifying the covariance function of the random field. A practitioner working with spatial data is presented a number of choices regarding the structure of the dependence between observations. One of these choices is to determine whether or not an isotropic covariance function is appropriate. Isotropy implies that spatial dependence does not depend on the direction of the spatial separation between sampling locations. Misspecification of isotropy properties (directional dependence) can lead to misleading inferences, for example, inaccurate predictions and parameter estimates. A researcher may use graphical diagnostics, such as directional sample variograms, to decide whether the assumption of isotropy is reasonable. These graphical techniques can be difficult to assess, open to subjective interpretations, and misleading. Hypothesis tests of the assumption of isotropy may be more desirable. To this end, a number of tests of directional dependence have been developed using both the spatial and spectral representations of random fields. We provide an overview of nonparametric methods available to test the hypotheses of isotropy and symmetry in spatial data. We discuss important considerations in choosing a test, provide recommendations for implementing a test, compare several of the methods via a simulation study, and propose a number of open research questions. Several of the reviewed methods can be implemented in R using our package spTest, available on CRAN.

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Zachary D. Weller. Jennifer A. Hoeting. "A Review of Nonparametric Hypothesis Tests of Isotropy Properties in Spatial Data." Statist. Sci. 31 (3) 305 - 324, August 2016. https://doi.org/10.1214/16-STS547

Information

Published: August 2016
First available in Project Euclid: 27 September 2016

zbMATH: 06946228
MathSciNet: MR3552737
Digital Object Identifier: 10.1214/16-STS547

Rights: Copyright © 2016 Institute of Mathematical Statistics

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Vol.31 • No. 3 • August 2016
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