Translator Disclaimer
June 2003 How do bootstrap and permutation tests work?
Arnold Janssen, Thorsten Pauls
Ann. Statist. 31(3): 768-806 (June 2003). DOI: 10.1214/aos/1056562462

Abstract

Resampling methods are frequently used in practice to adjust critical values of nonparametric tests. In the present paper a comprehensive and unified approach for the conditional and unconditional analysis of linear resampling statistics is presented. Under fairly mild assumptions we prove tightness and an asymptotic series representation for their weak accumulation points. From this series it becomes clear which part of the resampling statistic is responsible for asymptotic normality. The results leads to a discussion of the asymptotic correctness of resampling methods as well as their applications in testing hypotheses. They are conditionally correct iff a central limit theorem holds for the original test statistic. We prove unconditional correctness iff the central limit theorem holds or when symmetric random variables are resampled by a scheme of asymptotically random signs. Special cases are the m (n) out of k (n) bootstrap, the weighted bootstrap, the wild bootstrap and all kinds of permutation statistics. The program is carried out for convergent partial sums of rowwise independent infinitesimal triangular arrays in detail. These results are used to compare power functions of conditional resampling tests and their unconditional counterparts. The proof uses the method of random scores for permutation type statistics.

Citation

Download Citation

Arnold Janssen. Thorsten Pauls. "How do bootstrap and permutation tests work?." Ann. Statist. 31 (3) 768 - 806, June 2003. https://doi.org/10.1214/aos/1056562462

Information

Published: June 2003
First available in Project Euclid: 25 June 2003

zbMATH: 1028.62027
MathSciNet: MR1994730
Digital Object Identifier: 10.1214/aos/1056562462

Subjects:
Primary: 62G09, 62G10

Rights: Copyright © 2003 Institute of Mathematical Statistics

JOURNAL ARTICLE
39 PAGES


SHARE
Vol.31 • No. 3 • June 2003
Back to Top