Missouri Journal of Mathematical Sciences

Minimizing Times Between Boundary Points on Rectangular Pools

Tonja Miick and Tom Richmond

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Abstract

The well-known ``do dogs know calculus'' problem optimizes the travel time from an onshore dog to an offshore stick, given different running and swimming speeds and a straight coastline. Here, we optimize the travel time between two points on the boundary of a rectangular swimming pool, assuming that running speed along the edge differs from the swimming speed.

Article information

Source
Missouri J. Math. Sci., Volume 28, Issue 1 (2016), 2-14.

Dates
First available in Project Euclid: 19 September 2016

Permanent link to this document
https://projecteuclid.org/euclid.mjms/1474295351

Mathematical Reviews number (MathSciNet)
MR3549803

Zentralblatt MATH identifier
1351.26004

Subjects
Primary: 26A06: One-variable calculus
Secondary: 65K10: Optimization and variational techniques [See also 49Mxx, 93B40]

Keywords
optimization

Citation

Miick, Tonja; Richmond, Tom. Minimizing Times Between Boundary Points on Rectangular Pools. Missouri J. Math. Sci. 28 (2016), no. 1, 2--14. https://projecteuclid.org/euclid.mjms/1474295351


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References

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