Translator Disclaimer
15 September 2013 A hierarchy of local symplectic filling obstructions for contact 3-manifolds
Chris Wendl
Duke Math. J. 162(12): 2197-2283 (15 September 2013). DOI: 10.1215/00127094-2348333

Abstract

We generalize the familiar notions of overtwistedness and Giroux torsion in 3-dimensional contact manifolds, defining an infinite hierarchy of local filling obstructions called planar torsion, whose integer-valued order k0 can be interpreted as measuring a gradation in “degrees of tightness” of contact manifolds. We show in particular that any contact manifold with planar torsion admits no contact-type embeddings into any closed symplectic 4-manifold, and has vanishing contact invariant in embedded contact homology, and we give examples of contact manifolds that have planar k-torsion for any k2 but no Giroux torsion. We also show that the complement of the binding of a supporting open book never has planar torsion. The unifying idea in the background is a decomposition of contact manifolds in terms of contact fiber sums of open books along their binding. As the technical basis of these results, we establish existence, uniqueness, and compactness theorems for certain classes of J-holomorphic curves in blown-up summed open books; these also imply algebraic obstructions to planarity and embeddings of partially planar domains.

Citation

Download Citation

Chris Wendl. "A hierarchy of local symplectic filling obstructions for contact 3-manifolds." Duke Math. J. 162 (12) 2197 - 2283, 15 September 2013. https://doi.org/10.1215/00127094-2348333

Information

Published: 15 September 2013
First available in Project Euclid: 9 September 2013

zbMATH: 1279.57019
MathSciNet: MR3102479
Digital Object Identifier: 10.1215/00127094-2348333

Subjects:
Primary: 57R17
Secondary: 32Q65 , 53D10 , 53D42

Rights: Copyright © 2013 Duke University Press

JOURNAL ARTICLE
87 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
Vol.162 • No. 12 • 15 September 2013
Back to Top