Statistical Science

Comment: “Models as Approximations I: Consequences Illustrated with Linear Regression” by A. Buja, R. Berk, L. Brown, E. George, E. Pitkin, L. Zhan and K. Zhang

Roderick J. Little

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Article information

Source
Statist. Sci., Volume 34, Number 4 (2019), 580-583.

Dates
First available in Project Euclid: 8 January 2020

Permanent link to this document
https://projecteuclid.org/euclid.ss/1578474022

Digital Object Identifier
doi:10.1214/19-STS726

Mathematical Reviews number (MathSciNet)
MR4048588

Citation

Little, Roderick J. Comment: “Models as Approximations I: Consequences Illustrated with Linear Regression” by A. Buja, R. Berk, L. Brown, E. George, E. Pitkin, L. Zhan and K. Zhang. Statist. Sci. 34 (2019), no. 4, 580--583. doi:10.1214/19-STS726. https://projecteuclid.org/euclid.ss/1578474022


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See also

  • Main article: Models as Approximations I: Consequences Illustrated with Linear Regression.
  • Main article: Models as Approximations II: A Model-Free Theory of Parametric Regression.