Statistical Science

Statistical Thinking an Statistical Practice: Themes Gleaned from Professional Statisticians

Maxine Pfannkuch and Chris J. Wild

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Abstract

Advancing computer technology is allowing us to downplay instruction in mechanical procedures and shift emphasis towards teaching the “art” of statistics. This paper is based upon interviews with six professional statisticians about statistical thinking and statistical practice. It presents themes emerging from their professional experience, emphasizing dimensions that were surprising to them and were not part of their statistical training. Emerging themes included components of sta­ tistical thinking, pointers to good statistical practices and the subtleties of interacting with the thinking of others, particularly coworkers and clients. The main purpose of the research is to uncover basic elements of applied statistical practice and statistical thinking for the use of teachers of statistics.

Article information

Source
Statist. Sci., Volume 15, Number 2 (2000), 132-152.

Dates
First available in Project Euclid: 24 December 2001

Permanent link to this document
https://projecteuclid.org/euclid.ss/1009212754

Digital Object Identifier
doi:10.1214/ss/1009212754

Keywords
Consulting environment, , , , , psychology of data statistical empirical enquiry practitioners' experiences characteristics of thinking applied statistics

Citation

Pfannkuch, Maxine; Wild, Chris J. Statistical Thinking an Statistical Practice: Themes Gleaned from Professional Statisticians. Statist. Sci. 15 (2000), no. 2, 132--152. doi:10.1214/ss/1009212754. https://projecteuclid.org/euclid.ss/1009212754


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